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Building that housed Kincora Boys’ Home is facing demolition

20th OCT 2018

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Planning permission has been submitted to raze the building that once housed the notorious Kincora Boys’ Home.

Located on the Upper Newtownards Road, the building was renamed Linden House in 1996.

An application has been submitted for the demolition of the building and its replacement by 12 two-bedroom apartments.

The site was put on the market in August with offers of over £375,000 invited.

Established in 1958 to provide full-time accommodation for boys aged between 15 and 18, Kincora closed in 1980 following the exposure of serious sexual abuse by some staff and others over a number of years.

Current owner Leslie Black, managing partner with Market Solutions (NI), said: “When we purchased the building in 1996 we found that the name had been forgotten by most of the new generation within the area.

“We invested a substantial sum in refurbishment and it was renamed Linden House from 1996, being used for our own marketing business.

“We also sub-let offices to a range of tenants.

“In over 20 years, we had only one visitor who called and was fully aware of the history of the building as a boys’ home.”

Mr Black said there were plans to refurbish the building, but claimed these were compromised in April 2015 by comments from then First Minister Peter Robinson, who called for the building to be “razed” due to its history.

A series of protests followed and the new focus on the building led him to decide to put the redevelopment plans on hold.

“We no longer consider that retention of the existing building with the planned development is commercially attractive due to its history having been thrust back into the public eye,” he added.

Meanwhile, KRW Law has argued the Kincora scandal should be addressed as part of the Northern Ireland Office’s consultation on dealing with legacy issues.

The firm represents Richard Kerr, who alleges he was abused by “very powerful people” with links to Kincora and does not accept the conclusions of the four-year Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry.

The inquiry dismissed long-standing claims that senior politicians, civil servants and businessmen were complicit in a paedophile ring at Kincora during the 1970s

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/building-that-housed-kincora-boys-home-is-facing-demolition-37439550.html

READ MORE 

  1. MI5 ‘uncovered a VIP paedophile ring operating at a Belfast boys’ home in the 1970s – but used information to blackmail the abusers rather than stop abuse’
  2. AANGIRFAN ~ KINCORA – CIA, MOSSAD, MI5, MI6 – THE BIGGER PICTURE
  3. MOUNTBATTEN LINKED TO KINCORA

The truth behind the Northern Ireland Troubles – Kincora Boys Home – What they don’t want you to know…

1988 was the year of the tri-centenary of the Bill of Rights, yet in the shadowy studio of Channel 4’s After Dark programme, this edition considers British intelligence, spies, traitors and those in positions of power abusing children… And then the cover up. Discussion Participants:

Merlyn Rees MP Former Home Secretary and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

H. Montgomery Hyde Writer and former MI6 Officer.

Robert Harbinson Writer, composer and lecturer.

Air Commodore Alastair Mackie Former Cabinet Secretary on the Joint Intelligence Committee and Vice President of CND.

Robin Ramsay Radical Journalist and co-editor of Lobster Magazine.

Jock Kane Former GCHQ Radio Operator.

Gary Murray Journalist and former Private Investigator.

The Financial Times wrote: “Channel 4’s After Dark triumphantly broke all the rules from the beginning”….

Broadcast on 16th July 1988 Channel 4 – Before the 1989 Official Secrets Act…

After Dark was a British late-night live discussion programme broadcast on Channel 4 television between 1987 and 1997, and on the BBC in 2003. Described as “one of the great television talk formats of all time” and the “the most intelligent, thought-provoking and interesting programme ever to have been on television”. In 2010 the television trade magazine Broadcast wrote “After Dark defined the first 10 years of Channel 4, just as Big Brother did for the second”…

Broadcast live and with no scheduled end time, the series, inspired by an Austrian programme called Club 2, was considered to be a groundbreaking reinvention of the discussion programme format. The programme was hosted by a variety of presenters, and each episode had around half a dozen guests, often including a member of the public…

The show ended in 1991 but a number of one-off specials and a BBC revival followed, before the programme finally came to an end in 2003. In 2004 After Dark was characterised as “legendary” by the Open University and in 2014 as “the most uncensorable programme in the history of British television”…

The full 3+ hour discussion

In April 1990 Bryans publicly stated in the Dublin-based magazine Now that Lord Mountbatten, Blunt and others were involved in an ‘old-boy network’ which held ritualistic abuse in country houses and castles on both sides of the Irish border, as well as at the Kincora Boys’ Home. Bryans sent letters and postcards to the rich and powerful in British establishment circles but once the postcards began to circulate there were complaints to the police and he was warned that he would be prosecuted for criminal libel. A not untypical example of Bryan’s letter-writing style is copied HERE

One survivor, Richard Kerr, fell victim to this paedophile ring in the 1970s, when he was sent to the Kincora Boys Home in Belfast, Northern Ireland…

From Kincora, Kerr, like many others, was trafficked all over the UK to be abused by powerful men…

The CEC’s 24 June release also identified the paedophile ring operating out of the Kincora boys’ home, in connection with the murder gangs that British intelligence coordinated in Northern Ireland, under the command of Brigadier General Frank Kitson, to orchestrate terrorism and civil war… Though his troops opened fire on unarmed civilians in the infamous “Bloody Sunday” massacre of 30 January 1972, killing 13 civilians and wounding 13 more, the Crown showered honour after honour upon him, including an OBE for his work in Northern Ireland, while the Queen personally inducted him into her ultra-elite Order of the Bath…

Still alive, he retired in 1982 as Commander-in-Chief, UK Land Forces…

On 27 April 2015 Kitson and the Ministry of Defence were served with papers for negligence and misfeasance in office by Mary Heenan, widow of Eugene “Paddy” Heenan who was killed in 1973 by members of the Ulster Defence Association, because of “the use of loyalist paramilitary gangs to contain the republican-nationalist threat through terror, manipulation of the rule of law, infiltration and subversion all core to the Kitson military of doctrine endorsed by the British army and the British government at the time”…

The CEC release emphasised the unique significance of the Kincora story:

“Despite pleas from many quarters to do so, British Home Secretary Theresa May has staunchly refused to include the Kincora case in the independent child abuse inquiry, even though the present, local inquiry in Northern Ireland into Kincora under Anthony Hart QC lacks the legal powers to compel crucial witnesses to testify…

Why the steadfast refusal from Theresa May to include Kincora?????

Because there is abundant evidence now even in the public domain that MI5, MI6 and other British intelligence agencies know that not only was one of Kitson’s paramilitary ‘pseudo-gangs’ (Tara) at the centre of that affair, but that other, leading members of the British establishment were personally involved in the abuse, including Lord Mountbatten himself, Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures Sir Anthony Blunt, and numerous other high society figures from Ireland and England.” SOURCE

 

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