Brother of Inverness tot Clyde WITNESSED DAD BEATING MUM WI A DOG CHAIN. WHY WERE THEY NOT ON CHILD PROTECTION REGISTER?

Post-mortem due on two-year-old boy found dead in Inverness flat STV 25 Feb 2014

Paramedics tried to save the toddler after his older brother raised the alarm with neighbours on Sunday.

The results of a post-mortem examination on a two-year-old boy found dead at a flat in the Highlands is due on Tuesday.

<img class=”resp-img__image” src=”http://files.stv.tv/imagebase/224/w384/224717-amanda-haride-and-2-year-old-clyde-who-was-found-dead-at-home-in-inverness-must-credit-inverness-co.jpg” />
 

An investigation has been launched after the death of the child, named locally as Clyde, on Sunday at his family home in Inverness.

He was the youngest of two boys who shared the flat in the city’s Raigmore district with their mother, Amanda Hardie. She won a modelling competition to become the Face of Inverness last year.

It is understood the eldest brother raised the alarm with neighbours. Paramedics tried to revive the child but an ambulance crew could not save him.

A spokesman said:

“Police are currently investigating the death of a two-year-old boy in the Mackintosh Road area of Inverness, which was reported on the afternoon of Sunday, February 23. Emergency services were called around 3.06pm to the address and attempts were made to resuscitate him but these were sadly unsuccessful. “The death is currently being treated as unexplained and a post mortem will be carried out. The next of kin have been informed.”

SOURCE STVnews


Man jailed for dog chain attack on girlfriend 

Published 17/09/09 | Updated 24/11/11

A MAN who carried out a violent attack using a dog chain on his girlfriend has been jailed for a year.

Kevin Campbell 

Kevin Campbell (26) subjected his victim Amanda Hardie to a “sustained and prolonged” attack which was witnessed by her young son, who phoned police on his mobile telephone in an attempt to help his mum.

 

Depute Fiscal Ron Phillips told Inverness Sheriff Court this week that Campbell had gone over to Miss Hardie’s home in the Raigmore area of Inverness to give her £50 that he owed her, and the pair had sat up drinking some vodka, listening to music and watching television.

He said: “When the victim rose from the settee, and reached across to switch over the television channel, she was struck on the head with a clay pot. As she fell to the floor, she struck her head on the edge of the coffee table.”

Campbell then grabbed her neck with both hands and squeezed her neck to the extent that she was unable to breathe properly.

Mr Phillips said Campbell then grabbed a metal dog chain and used it repeatedly to hit her across the back, legs and neck. Miss Hardie managed to escape to the kitchen, but Campbell followed her and then forced her to remove all her clothes, including her bra and pants, according to the fiscal.

“The accused then walked away, began eating a bag of crisps, poured himself a vodka and walked back into the living room,” he said: “She took the opportunity to put her clothes back on, but when she got up to go to the living room, he continued the assault by punching her and compressing her neck with his hands and the chain.”

It was at this point that Miss Hardie’s son came through to the living room and told Campbell to “leave his mummy alone.”

The youngster tried to call the police on his mother’s asking, but Campbell managed to grab the phone and continue the assault on Miss Hardie.

Mr Phillips said: “He resumed striking the victim’s legs, head and back with the chain. While this is all going on, the child managed to grab the phone that fell out of Campbell’s pocket and the victim was able to shout out the address to the police.”

The attack finally came to an end when Campbell jumped out the first floor window to the ground.

The fiscal said: “It is clear that the contribution of the child during this violent attack proved to be an unwelcome distraction as far as Campbell is concerned and fortuitous from the victim’s point of view.”

Defence solicitor Neil Wilson said his client was at a loss to explain what happened that night.

He said: “It is plain that on this occasion, he completely lost it and the red mist descended.”

Mr Wilson told the court while in custody, Campbell had taken courses to deal with anger management and problems with alcohol.

He added that Miss Hardie was very supportive of Campbell and had been going to visit him regularly since he had been remanded in custody.

Campbell, described as a prisoner of Inverness, admitted assaulting Miss Hardie to her severe injury at her home on June 15 this year.

Sheriff Ian Abercrombie told Campbell: “The offence is so horrific I have got to think about prison. I bear in mind that you have shown remorse and that your girlfriend, for some extraordinary reason, wants you back.” SOURCE HighlandNews


 

The article was written September 2009 obviously after Campbell’s court case.

So say it took 6months to 1 yr to come to court..  So end of 2008 – beginning of 2009? roughly.

Clyde’s big brother was able to use the phone to phone the police…  so at a rough guess was at least age 4 when it happened, 5 when it came to court in sept 2009

Clyde died in Feb 2014. The older brother was in the house with him. Presumably “babysitting”

So the eldest boy was about age 10/11, possibly older….

Since 2008/09 the Social work Department were FULLY AWARE OF ELDEST BEING AT RISK..  So WHERE WERE THEY?

THEN if we take this into acc…. (Extracts from todays P&J )

How #NamedPerson scheme abandoned #Highland capital’s tragic toddler Clyde

How Named Person scheme abandoned tragic toddler Clyde  15 June 2016

Tragic toddler Clyde Campbell had no contact with his “named person” in the year and a half leading up to his death – after his uncaring mother told them to stop visiting.

The two-year-old died of cot death after five months of neglect at the hands of Amanda Hardie, who stayed at a boyfriend’s house the night before he died.

The SNP claimed just a few weeks ago that Clyde’s case “underlined the need” for its controversial state guardian scheme to be rolled out nationwide.

But a Press and Journal investigation has found that the named person – a health visitor – overseeing the welfare of the Inverness youngster only got in touch with the family four times.

The unnamed official visited the home of Hardie twice in the first month of little Clyde’s life in 2012.

After that there were just two further contacts, in April and August of that year, both of which were phone calls, and only one of which was answered.

In response to a message left during the final call on August 8, 2012, Hardie told the named person that she did not want any further visits.

That was enough to ensure the family was not contacted again by the named person until after Clyde was found dead in his home more than 17 months later, on February 23, 2014.

Last month, Hardie was sentenced to 10 months in jail after pleading guilty to wilfully ill-treating, abandoning, neglecting and exposing Clyde to unnecessary suffering or injury.

She admitted leaving him unattended and without adult supervision for prolonged periods and, on the evening before his body was found, had worked a shift at a city nightclub before spending the night at her boyfriend’s home.

After she admitted the neglect in March, an SNP spokesman told the Press and Journal that the case highlighted the need for the named person scheme, which has been operating in the Highlands since 2010, and is due to be rolled out nationwide in a few weeks.

It can also be revealed today that Clyde was never assessed as being at risk of significant harm or placed on the child protection register.

He was not on the register despite both mum Hardie and dad Kevin Campbell having convictions for violence.

Highland Council social work chiefs revealed last night that a review was under way into Clyde’s tragic death – but insisted that staff other than the named person had been working with the family in the lead-up to his death, including police, hospital staff, children’s services and his nursery.

Mr Alexander said:

“Clyde was within other levels of intervention within children’s services.”

READ IN FULL HERE


SOCIAL WORK DEPT KNEW THEY WERE AT RISK & SO DID (OR CERTAINLY SHOULD HAVE KNOWN) CLYDE’S NAMED PERSON…

WHY DID CLYDE NOT HAVE A SOCIAL WORKER?

WHY WAS HE NOT ON THE AT RISK REGISTER?

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